Do You Monitor or Measure Your Media Coverage?

Posted on August 1, 2011. Filed under: Measurement | Tags: , , |

When it comes to media measurement, many companies these days confuse the simple process of media monitoring with the goal-oriented and methodical process of media measurement.

As a standalone tool, media monitoring provides little value if utilized as the only “measurement technique.” Media measurement supported by media monitoring, on the other hand, helps you monitor, benchmark, and analyze your company’s media coverage to ensure that it is fair and accurate, occurs on a regular basis, and is in line with your overall communications strategy. To be able to derive that from your monitored media, it is important to ensure that your measurement roadmap is a) aligned with your business objectives, b) has broad communications goals, c) supported by specific objectives that are realistic and achievable, and occur during a specific timeframe.

Defining your communications goals and objectives is a time- and effort-consuming endeavor, and should take into consideration your overall strategy, your audience, and your desired outcome. At the end of the day, however, it is the specifics of your effort that allow you to see whether or not you have accomplished what you set out to accomplish. If, after completing the full cycle, you realize that your program did not reach those objectives, then you should revisit your goals and objectives and identify the areas that need improvement. Your evaluation effort should be an ongoing and continuous study of your communications programs, and not just a retroactive narrative of your past coverage. The important thing to keep in mind is that your measurement program is not set in stone, but rather, is a living and breathing document that changes as your needs change, and requires a long-term commitment and investment in order to ultimately change perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors.

Lusine Kodagolian is a Media Consultant at Dow Jones

 

 

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The Fukushima Effect – Nuclear Energy And The Media

Posted on May 9, 2011. Filed under: Measurement, Newspapers, Public Relations | Tags: , , , , , , |

It is no surprise that the future of nuclear power is on top of the news agenda in many countries as part of the aftermath of the Fukushima incident. You also might have expected that companies related to nuclear power like Areva, GE-Hitachi or Toshiba are flooded with negative press.

But what might be a surprise is that renewable energy didn’t benefit much from this crisis in terms of an increase of discussions in the media. What was also rather unexpected is the fact that some media – especially in the Middle East – still spoke rather positively about nuclear energy after the recent crisis.

The Power Of Newswires: Understanding The Media Landscape

Another interesting aspect of our study: Newswires have been the most reliable original traditional media source during Japan’s nuclear crisis.

The Tepco Case – Jeopardizing Japan’s Food Industry

As far as the operator of the Fukushima power plants, Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco), are concerned, traditional media are paying the most attention, although there are also many discussions taking place in blogs and forums. For a crisis of this extent, it should be expected that the disaster-ridden news coverage about Tepco has been almost entirely negative.

However, the unfavourable press is not limited to (nuclear) power generation and distribution. In fact, Tepco seems have become connected to major industrial issues in Japan and worldwide; from food and goods contamination to the dive of Japan’s whole export-drive economy. This is certainly a warning signal to any company to consider crisis scenarios beyond their direct line of business.

Holistic Crisis Management – To Be Prepared Is Everything

As said by Shakespeare: To be prepared is everything. For communicators, this means that crisis scenario planing should be done with the utmost holistic approach.

Georg Ackermann is the team leader of the Dow Jones Media Lab in Singapore. Lars Voedisch is a media consultant covering the Asia-Pacific region.

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How Well Does The PR Industry Promote Itself In Asia Pacific?

Posted on May 4, 2011. Filed under: Measurement, Public Relations | Tags: , , |

Dow Jones Insight Analysis Ranks Coverage of Large Agencies Across The Region

How effective are the region’s leading public relations firms at promoting and managing their own brands? Using the Dow Jones Insight media analysis tool, Dow Jones measured the media coverage of the world’s public relations firms, compiling a list of the large firms that generated the most media attention in Asia Pacific for the past 12 month of April 2010 to March 2011. Of the firms examined in the region, Burson-Marsteller, Hill & Knowlton and Ogilvy PR drew top media coverage volumes. This analysis measured large PR firms’ coverage in traditional media outlets.

Interestingly, out of these top three only Ogilvy got awarded by The Holmes Report’s recent Agency-of-the-Year ranking – in the “Digital Consultancy of the Year” category.

 Asia Top Three: Burson Marsteller, Hill & Knowlton and Ogilvy

Dow Jones designated firms with more than $50 million in annual fee income as large. For this first-of-its-kind analysis, Dow Jones Insight compared English media coverage for the key Asia Pacific markets Australia, Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, India, Singapore, Malaysia in the past 12 months. Solely negative, issue-related media coverage was excluded.

Lars Voedisch is a media consultant based in Singapore.

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Promoting PR

Posted on February 11, 2011. Filed under: Public Relations | Tags: , , , , , , |

Just a couple of weeks ago, Dow Jones published an analysis of PR agencies. Using Dow Jones Insight, our media analysis service, we looked at the media coverage of PR agencies and identified those who were covered the most.

The story generated a lot of interest, and several readers pointed out that PR firms typically are too busy promoting clients rather than themselves. That led PRNewswer to survey its readers, asking whether appearing on the list was a good thing or not. The results are in, and nearly two-thirds said it was.

We plan to take a look at social media coverage of PR firms in June, so stay tuned.

Diane Thieke is Marketing Director at Dow Jones, based in Princeton, NJ.
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